Fueling The Cause-Protests & Food

dc protest

I attended the Women’s March in Washington DC on January 21, and it was an exhilarating experience.  There was an atmosphere of love, support, tolerance and a much justified dose of outrage.  My two friends and I drove down from the Philadelphia area. We waved to others on the road showing their signs from their cars and wearing their pink hats. The mood was uplifting; from the train ride in, though the march to the train ride back out.  I was so glad to be a part of this historic march.

This march has kickstarted many other marches on various days worldwide. With so much to protest about, I thought I would look into how food has played a part in the history of protests, and also touch on what to eat and drink when you are protesting.

The History of Protest and Food

Food and protests have gone hand in hand throughout history.  But why food?  Well, first of all, it was accessible.Tomatoes, eggs, easy to get and they make a great splat. NOTE: I don’t condone throwing ANYTHING.  No one should get injured in a protest.   While throwing food may be considered non-violent, I wouldn’t risk getting arrested for throwing an egg.

The first recorded protest with food was in 63 AD in present day Tunisia. Roman Emperor Vespasian was pelted with turnips by people who were angered by food shortages under his reign. That had to hurt…

turnip
ouch

Eggs historically were very popular at protests. In the Middle Ages people were put in stocks and pelted with eggs.  Abolitionist George Whittier was hit with eggs at an anti-slavery talk in 1834. Even Arnold Schwarzenegger was hit with an egg in 2003 on a campaign trip for governor of California.   In 2011 Afghan protesters threw eggs at the Iranian consulate to protest a fuel blockade that caused fuel prices to soar. But the biggest egg protest took place in 2013, when French farmers broke 100,000 eggs a day to protest the low price of eggs set by the European Union.

french egg protest
Sometimes you gotta break some eggs…

On to tomatoes. While typically seen as a response to a poor theatrical performance, tomatoes have been used in protests.  In fact, one tomato protest has turned into an annual festival. La Tomatina occurs in  Bunol, in the Valencia region of Spain on a Wednesday every August. The legend is that the townspeople were upset with their town council and threw tomatoes at them. That one event  became the present day festival.  The festival begins with a ham being placed on a greased pole, and participants climb the pole to retrieve the ham.  Once the ham has been obtained, the tomato throwing begins. A cannon sounds, and the tons of tomatoes are thrown. Its chaotic, and messy.  The throwing continues for two hours, then the cannon fires and the throwing stops.

Not sure what happens after that.  Many, many showers, I guess..

la tomatina
La Tomatina Festival

The cream pie in the face has had its place in protest history. Ok, most of the time, you see this in the Three Stooges or I Love Lucy… but both Ralph Nader and Rupert Murdoch have been “pied”. Anita Bryant got a pie in the face in 1977 during a press conference when  she was trying to justify the fact that she hated gay people.  Again, I don’t condone this, as it could cause injury, and you may get arrested for assault (but Anita had that one coming..)

Lack of food has had a significant place in protest history. The hunger strike has been used  in many circumstances as a form of protest. The first hunger strike is purported to have happened in ancient India.  Indian scriptures tell the tale of when King Rama’s brother fasted to urge the King to return from exile. Gandhi  was on a hunger strike for six days to protest the British government’s decision to place a strict separation between India’s lowest and highest social castes. Gandhi’s actions caused this decision to be reversed.

gandhi
Gandhi

In the United States, suffragettes went on hunger strikes in jail. This method usually got them released prior to completion of their sentence.  But Alice Paul, famous woman activist and organizer of the Woman Suffrage Procession (and a Jersey girl from Mount Laurel!), was force-fed in a London prison. This damaged her gastrointestinal system permanently.  Alice Paul returned to the USA, attended the University of Pennsylvania and continued her work in the Suffrage movement.  Read more about Alice Paul here: http://nationalwomansparty.org/learn/who-is-alice-paul/

Alice Paul
Thank you, Alice!

I found this really terrific blog called “Food and Resistance“.  It is a collection of food related protest signs from various protests.  Go check out the images. They are powerful and also humorous.

My favorite? “Muslims Invented Coffee”.

Staying Fueled While Protesting

So you are getting out and standing up for what you believe in. Good for you! Here are a few tips for staying fueled during your protest experience.

  • Cut back on the coffee. I know, this is a tough one.  But  comfort stations can be few and far between, and lines can be long.  And peeing on the White House lawn is illegal…also a good idea to BYOTP.  (Toilet Paper)
  • Fuel up in the morning.  I recommend more protein than carbs.  Eggs will keep you fuller longer than a bowl of cereal. Perhaps a little fruit as well, to get some sugars for energy.
  • Bring snacks. Granola bars, more fruit.  You can also bring a wrap. Refried beans and rice with cheese in a tortilla are easy to carry, and have a great mix of carbs and protein. Make a few, and wrap them in plastic.  Yes, you will have to eat them cold, but you can deal this one time.
  • Bring water, but watch your intake. You will need to stay hydrated, but drink just what you need. Again, the peeing issue. Warmer weather will cause you to need more liquids. Look at bringing some green tea with honey. This provides good energy and will soothe your throat from all of your yelling and cheering. Throat lozenges are also a good idea.
  • Bring some chewing gum. This helps keep you from getting dry mouth, and you won’t drink as much water.

If you are one of the organizers of a march, try to engage restaurants and food stores who may be sympathetic to your cause to provide some eats and drinks along the march route.  They may choose to donate or sell. If they donate, make sure you provide a  money jar for  donations to cover their costs.

When you are done with your march, patronize the local restaurants. You are supporting the local economy, and you will assuredly meet others who were in the march as well.  Share a table with some strangers.

These are challenging times.  But I am so optimistic.  People are becoming engaged, getting involved and running for office.

So get up, get out, make some noise.  Fuel your cause.

 

 

 

 

Pass the Haggis-A Brief History of the Burns Supper

robert-burns

Robert Burns, the bard poet of Scotland , was born on January 25, 1759.  He became the voice of Scotland with his poetry and song. In 1801, on the fifth anniversary of his death, nine men who knew him well gathered to have a memorial dinner in Robbie’s honor. There was ritual and remembrances, and a toast at the end.

Oh, and haggis. More on that later.

Thus began the tradition of the Burns Supper.  Around January 25, people and organizations hold the traditional Burns Supper to remember Robert Burn’s legacy.  And  it is quite a party.

First, everyone gathers and chats, and checks out the whiskey selection.  Many varieties are offered, from light Scotches to my favorite, the dark, peaty, malty ones.

Next is the call to the table by the host and the Selkirk Grace is recited:

 Selkirk Grace

Some hae meat and canna eat,
And some wad eat that want it;
But we hae meat, and we can eat,
Sae let the Lord be thankit.

The soup course is then served.  The Cullen-Skirk soup is traditionally served. It is a creamy fish and leek soup. Click here for the recipe.

The next part is my favorite–The Parade of the Haggis. A bagpiper leads the procession and “pipes in the haggis” to the guests. The chef follows the piper, and presents the haggis to each of the guests.  The haggis is then placed on the table in front of the host, and a reciter will  read the “Address to a Haggis”:

piping-haggis
Piping in the Haggis

Address to a Haggis

Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o’ the pudding-race!
Aboon them a’ yet tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye wordy o’a grace
As lang’s me arm.

The groaning trencher there ye fill,
Your hurdies like a distant hill,
Your pin wad help to mend a mill
In time o’need,
While thro’ your pores the dews distil
Like amber bead.

His knife see rustic Labour dight,
An’ cut you up wi’ ready sleight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright,
Like ony ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm-reekin’, rich!

Then, horn for horn, they stretch an’ strive:
Deil tak the hindmost! on they drive,
Till a’ their weel-swall’d kytes belyve
Are bent like drums;
Then auld Guidman, maist like to rive,
Bethankit! hums.

Is there that owre his French ragout
Or olio that wad staw a sow,
Or fricassee wad make her spew
Wi’ perfect sconner,
Looks down wi’ sneering, scornfu’ view
On sic a dinner?

Poor devil! see him owre his trash,
As feckles as wither’d rash,
His spindle shank, a guid whip-lash;
His nieve a nit;
Thro’ blody flood or field to dash,
O how unfit!

But mark the Rustic, haggis-fed,
The trembling earth resounds his tread.
Clap in his walie nieve a blade,
He’ll mak it whissle;
An’ legs an’ arms, an’ heads will sned,
Like taps o’ trissle.

Ye Pow’rs, wha mak mankind yer care,
And dish them out their bill o’ fare,
Auld Scotland wants nae skinking ware
That jaups in luggies;
But, if ye wish her gratefu’ prayer
Gie her a haggis!

To see what this means in English, you can find the translation here.

Whiskey is offered to the chef, the reciter and the piper, and the host ceremoniously slices open the haggis with a dirk-a small dagger- but any sharp knife will do.

About haggis.  This is a dish that was made in the fields by shepherds watching over their flocks. It was one of those  meals  that was born out of necessity.  Haggis consists of  sheep heart, liver and lungs, ground up, with oatmeal, onion or leek, spices, salt and some stock. It was encased into the sheep’s stomach and boiled or steamed.  Before you get turned off by this, try it.  It is quite delicious.  I love it. Haggis is served with “neeps and tatties”-turnips and potatoes. You can find a contemporary haggis recipe here.

haggis-2
Haggis, Dirk and Whiskey

After the meal, it is time for songs and poems. And more whiskey.  The host will  deliver the Immortal Memory Address, which  is a biographical telling  about Robert Burns, and ends with a toast to the Bard.

Guests are invited to read from Burns’ poems and to perform songs, and this is great fun! Some folks have the Scottish brogue down, others, not so much.  Again, more whiskey…

Next up is the Toast to the Lassies– a  light-hearted lampoon of the shortcomings of women.  But fear not, ladies, because next is the Reply From the Lassies– an opportunity to note the shortcomings of men.  This is all done in fun and with great wit.  You can read both the Address and Reply here.

And now for the reading of one of Burns’ most epic poems, “Tam O’Shanter”.  It is a tale of drunkenness, debauchery, witches and ghosts. And the hero of the story is Tam’s horse, Maggie.  You can read both the Scottish and English version here.

tam-oshanter
Tam O’Shanter-Maggie lose her tail!

The evening progresses with more songs, poems and dancing.  The host will then do some closing remarks, thanking the chef and the piper and all who attended and raising a toast or two or three.

The finale of the evening is for everyone to sing “Auld Lang Syne”.  Nope, it’s not really a New Year’s Eve song. This is a song about friendship and the gladness of celebrating together.  You can see the Scottish and English translation here.

Once Auld Lang Syne is sung, the evening is officially over.

If you would like to go to a Burns Supper, look for a Scottish Society in your area that may be hosting one.  Or hold one yourself.  It’s  a bonnie auld tradition, full of fun and friends, with literature and drama.

Oh and whiskey…

 

 

Where Everybody Knows Your Name

 

cheers

The hangout. The go-to place. We all have one. But why?  Why have one place that you go to repeatedly? What is the allure to going to the same location, having the same experience over and over? Where is the fun in that?

The answer is:

Familiarity breeds well, familiarity. In other words, sometimes you just need a place that you can count on. Your happy spot. Your own version of “Cheers”.

We have lived in our new location for 2 years now, and while we enjoy eating out at all different types of places, we didn’t have our hangout.  And we missed that.

Growing up, I had a few places that were my hangouts. The Tewksbury Inn in Oldwick NJ, used to be a great bar and restaurant. The Inn was old, and the bar was an enormous old-fashioned wooden bar. The bathrooms were labeled “Bucks” and “Does” and there were deer heads mounted on the wall wearing hats, Hawaiian leis and smoking cigarettes.  You could get a burger and a pitcher of beer inexpensively and listen to local blues or bluegrass musicians.  But, as time went on, it was sold. The deer heads came down, and matching wallpaper and curtains went up. And so did the prices…. you can check it out here, but it ain’t no hangout…. $33 entrees, sheesh.

There was also Bernie’s Hillside Lounge in Chester, NJ.  Bernie’s has been around for a long time, and used to host  some well-known jazz musicians, like Bix  Beiderbecke.  I used to go there to listen to the Blue Sparks From Hell, a local band that played R & B, swing and blues. Frontman C.J. Tucker, was both talented and entertaining.  Sadly, Tucker has passed away, and the band is no longer playing.  But check them out on YouTube. Listen to one of their best songs “Caledonia”.  Bernie’s is still growing strong, playing music.  Stop in.

The Stanhope House in Stanhope, NJ was a haven for great music.  It was the place where everyone went to dance and drink. Sawdust on the floor, and plenty of graffiti in the restrooms.  Stevie Ray Vaughn and Buddy Guy were some of the notables that played here. I danced the night away many time, reveling in blues and R & B. I have a term for places like this.  It was my “clean dirty bar”.  Tidy enough to just barely pass a health inspection, but gritty,  colorful and raw.  Loved it.  It had closed for a time, but since has reopened, and back to being a roadhouse.  I haven’t been back in years, but may take a trip to see  if it’s still dirty.

So back to why we like our hangouts. Sometimes we need to go somewhere that doesn’t change much. After a day or a week of challenges, we all need to have some continuity.  And a hangout offers that. My requirements for a place to be a hangout are:

Casual Atmosphere-nothing fancy. I want to be able to go right from the horse barn in my horsey clothes to the hangout. No cloth tablecloths. No coordinating curtains and wallpaper. Just tables and a bar. Fireplace is a plus.

Great food with entrees under $20-yes, it can be done.  A hangout offers well priced entrees cooked superbly, plus burgers, salads and soups.  And some specials. No overdone plating, no foam, no pyrotechnics. Just fine fresh food cooked well.

A large selection of beer, wine and spirits- an extensive and changing craft beer list is a must.  With so many craft beers, local wineries and distilleries opening, I want to see  an establishment support local products IF- and only IF- they are quality.  And hard cider.  Love hard cider.

Friendly staff- without a doubt, one of the most important features of a hangout. Personable wait staff who know the menu, and are pleasant and chatty go a long way with me.  And a bartender who will remember what I like to order.  Remember, I can go anywhere, so if you get to know me I will be back. No surly or pretentious attitudes at a hangout.  No way.

We finally discovered our hangout here in Bucks County, PA. Becker’s Corner is located right near the beautiful Lake Nockamixon in Quakertown PA.  It meets all of the above requirements, and we head there whenever we don’t feel like cooking,  and we just want some time together.  We have gone there with friends, and we now run into people we know. And they have hard cider on tap. Perfect. Give this place a try.  You won’t be disappointed. And hey, we may meet at the bar.

What is your hangout?  What makes a place a hangout for you?  Share your place, spread the word.  Everyone need a place to hang out.

 

The Family Fudge Tradition

 

I just got done making a batch of the fudge that I make for gifts every year. It’s easy, and really sinfully good. My son has adopted the tradition of making it at the holidays as well. So I thought I would give the gift of this recipe to you all, my dear readers and followers!  Give it a try, and follow the tradition and pass the recipe on to your family and friends.

fudge

Refrigerator Fudge

  • 2  1/4 cups sugar
  • 3/4 cup (6 oz.) evaporated milk
  • 12 oz. semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1/3 cup corn syrup, light or dark
  • 2 TBSP butter, cut into small pieces
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup chopped nuts, raisins or coconut, optional

Combine sugar and evaporated milk in a heavy saucepan. Cook over medium heat stirring CONSTANTLY until mixture boils. Turn heat to low or medium low, so that it is still bubbling, and cook for 10 minutes, stirring CONSTANTLY to prevent scorching.

Remove from heat-don’t just turn the burner off- take the pan off of the burner- and IMMEDIATELY add butter, vanilla, corn syrup and chocolate pieces and stir well until the chocolate is melted, smooth and shiny. Add optional ingredients if desired and stir in and pour into a buttered 8 inch pan.

The mixture sets up rapidly, so spread it quickly.  Chill for  two hours in the refrigerator or until firm. Cut into pieces.

Makes 2  1/2 pounds.

The best method is to measure all of the ingredients out before you start cooking, and have it ready to pour into once the milk and sugar have cooked. You have to move fast, so it is easier if everything is opened and measured, and all you need to do is pour it in and stir.

A couple of variations that I like:

Add 2 tsp of peppermint  flavoring in when you add all of the ingredients.  This gives it a nice peppermint flavor.  You can crush up candy canes and sprinkle on top when the fudge is slightly set, before you chill it.

Once the fudge is cooled and slightly set, sprinkle sea salt on top.  You don’t want to add the salt when the fudge is too hot, it will get absorbed into the fudge.  It is a lovely combo of salt and sweet.  Delicious.

Or experiment with other ingredients.  Let me know what you come up with!

 

Happy Holidays, all!

 

 

 

Less is More

 

xmas-stress

Ah yes. It is the Holidays. With a capital H. Full of traditions and family rituals. Parties, gifts, food.

And a whole lotta work.

I am not being a Grinch here, far from it. And I don’t want to write another one of those ” how to reduce your stress at the holidays” pieces. We all see plenty of those. But the holidays are time consuming and exhausting.  As much as I want to enjoy the holidays, I also feel  anxious about it.

Bottom line is, I just want to have a good time.  And the best way to do that is to take the Less is More Method.

Less gifts. Less food. Less fuss. Less activity. Less anxiety.

I’m going for the Quality over Quantity Holiday this year.  My husband and I told our children that we don’t want any gifts this year except for them to contribute to our purchase of a new gas stove and cook-top.  We currently have an electric one, and if you are a serious cook, you all know how much electric cook-tops stink. So instead of buying gifts for each other, and trying to surmise what each other wants, we decided to buy the new stove.  Period. And our kids can give us money towards the purchase. Done and done.

Our children want gift cards for Christmas. And I used to fight that, thinking that it wasn’t personal enough, that it was a cop-out, that I should know them well enough to find the perfect gift, so if I bought a gift card, I was a lazy failure.  Not this year. Gift cards purchased. Done.

I’m still going to buy small gifts for the Christmas stockings, but I am going to be buying from socially responsible companies like Bombas. This company started out with a mission to provide socks for homeless people. They have done their research by interviewing the homeless for what they need in a sock, and redesigned socks to make them comfortable and long lasting.With every purchase you make, they donate a pair to help the homeless.
They started with a mission to help people in need, and have already donated over one million pairs of socks. I can get behind that.

I will also be buying from Penzeys Spices. A friend turned me onto this company, and their quality is the best, bar none.  But another reason I support them is how their CEO, William Penzey, has spoken out against the rash of racism, misogyny and fear mongering that is our current political climate.  Sure he has taken some hits on social media, but go read his letter to CEOs of other companies on their Facebook page here. This is a company worth purchasing from.

And I will be supporting local stores. I have some favorites, but I want to get into some local stores that I haven’t been to before. Plus, when you actually shop locally, you meet people who live locally. Instead of  hanging out on my laptop with my credit card,  I will get out and interact. Try it. Even if you don’t make a purchase you will be in the world.

Don’t need or don’t want any more “stuff”? I know I don’t.  Do what we did. We told our children that from now on, for holidays and birthdays, we only want:

  • Good things to eat
  • Good things to drink
  • Time with them

I have favorite wines that are always an acceptable gift! Plus, Turkish dried apricots, caramel and dark chocolate with sea salt candies,  balsamic vinegar, coffee, and more. Consumables are the perfect gift for me, as I don’t want any more:

  • coffee cups
  • tee shirts
  • refrigerator magnets
  • gee gaws and doo dahs

Time together is the one gift that we all too often fail to give or receive. Take time to go do something with your friends and family. Go to a museum or to a play, or go hiking. Dine out at a really special restaurant. That combines the time together gift with the great food and drink gift!  Be unscheduled and just hang out. A day playing board games, or reading a book, sitting around in our pajamas is not time wasted, it is time well spent.  So put aside some time to do something. Or nothing. Together.

We are working on our holiday meal menu, and we both do love to plan and prepare the feast. Our Christmas Day breakfast tradition is lox and bagels. Not your typical Christmas breakfast, but we love it. (This was the subject of my very first blog post, which you can read here.) We will most likely do some sort of roast beef, with the usual vegetables and pies for dessert.  In the past, we have done the traditional Italian meal of the Seven Fishes Dinner on Christmas Eve.  This is a perfect meal for a large group.  We have done a shrimp cocktail appetizer, clams in white wine over pasta, calamari,  or a bouillabaisse.  Our favorite story  was when my husband tried a recipe from the fifties that was  a crab dip with Worcestershire sauce and mayonnaise. If it sounds awful…. it was. What a waste of crab. It was INEDIBLE. We both tried it, gagged and just started laughing.  It is still one of our favorites tale of recipes gone horribly wrong.

And I will make a date with a friend who came over last year to make Christmas cookies. We had a blast. It was a great time to catch up, and we had so much fun. There was royal icing everywhere, but who cares?

I am sure there will still be some stressful or anxious moments over the holidays, but I am planning on letting go of anything that causes stress or discord.

My new ritual is…less ritual.

So, to my readers, I wish you a holiday season of less AND more.  This has been a tumultuous year, with more upheavals and discord on the horizon.

I wish you less stress and more peace.

I wish you less fear and more community.

I wish you less helplessness, and more power.

And I wish everyone  hope.  Give it. Share it. Receive it.

Happy Holidays to All.

 

winter-tree

Thanksgiving 2016-We Are All In Need of Comfort

diversity

 

This is a Thanksgiving unlike any other I have known. I am still reeling from the results of the election, as I think many of you are. I was going to share some recipes, and some tips, but that feels trivial to me right now. It’s going to be challenging to be thankful with everything that is happening.

But we have to rise above. That is not to say we normalize the situation, ignore it or take no action.  I believe that now more than ever, we must stand up for kindness and empathy.

So here is my take on getting through this Thanksgiving.

We need to celebrate our differences.  We need to celebrate our heritage and our cultures. We need to share our stories, and we need to hear the stories from others.  Our diversity is what makes us strong.  So we cannot give in to those who say otherwise. Ever.

I see many people who are struggling and are afraid. This is not who we are as a nation. We don’t incite fear, we work to take it away.  Always.

So how to get through this holiday when the whole premise is to be thankful? Not easy.

First, I think we all need to give ourselves a break. Not to forget, but just to let ourselves find a spot that is less painful. We need to put our outrage and our anger on hold for one day.  And we need to surround ourselves with our family and friends that we love. Use this Thanksgiving meal as your safe place. Enjoy the community of your own traditions. Find comfort in your meal and in your loved ones.

You can also give back. Go to a church or homeless shelter and serve dinner to those in need. They need to know that they have not been forgotten.  You can also donate to causes to help feed the hungry.  One is feedingamerica.org, but there are many national and local organizations that could use your support. Or invite a person or people that you don’t know very well to your dinner. In the Jewish faith, at Passover, it is customary to have one stranger at the meal. Find someone who you would like to get to know, and invite them. Expand your community to beyond your familiar gathering of folks. Be open. Be welcoming.

Celebrate diversity at your meal. While it is comforting to always have the same  menu for the holiday, try adding a dish from another culture. I found this New York Times article called “The American Thanksgiving” which is about all of the different menus from families of all different cultures.  It is what this nation is all about. So try something new. Add some diversity to your menu.  You can find the link to the article here.  It is inspiring.

Be thankful for what you have. This feels like a tall order right now and I struggle with this concept myself. But in spite of all that is going on in this country, we are fortunate. And we do have the ability to make change. I see it happening in the people who are rallying to run for office in their town or county. I plan to attend the Million Women March in Washington DC on January 21. I see it with people wearing safety pins and offering safe haven to those who are afraid.

Be thankful for those that you love and who love you. My 94-year-old mother, Betty passed away on November 1. So I am going through that list of “firsts”. First Thanksgiving without her, next will be Christmas. Both my father and my only sister passed away over 10 years ago. With the passing of my Mom, I am now parent-less. It’s a weird feeling. But I have a loving family, and I am so thankful for all of them. I wrote a blog post about my Mom and her banana cake recipe.  You can read it here. She would like that.

And after this holiday is over, take your strength and your fortitude to do what is right. Get involved. Run for the school board, your town council or get involved with a cause that you are passionate about.

What we cannot do is nothing. What we cannot do is normalize this. It took Hitler over ten years to bring about the persecution of the Jews, Catholics, People of Color, LGBT, those with mental or physical disabilities, Freemasons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, the list goes on.

History cannot repeat itself. And it will take all of us to protect the freedoms that are the core of this country. I am counting on all of you.

Let’s get to work.

Remember

Joy Harjo, 1951

Remember the sky that you were born under,
know each of the star’s stories.
Remember the moon, know who she is.
Remember the sun’s birth at dawn, that is the
strongest point of time. Remember sundown
and the giving away to night.
Remember your birth, how your mother struggled
to give you form and breath. You are evidence of
her life, and her mother’s, and hers.
Remember your father. He is your life, also.
Remember the earth whose skin you are:
red earth, black earth, yellow earth, white earth
brown earth, we are earth.
Remember the plants, trees, animal life who all have their
tribes, their families, their histories, too. Talk to them,
listen to them. They are alive poems.
Remember the wind. Remember her voice. She knows the
origin of this universe.
Remember you are all people and all people
are you.
Remember you are this universe and this
universe is you.
Remember all is in motion, is growing, is you.
Remember language comes from this.
Remember the dance language is, that life is.
Remember.

 

 

Autumn is Apple Time-Easy Recipes

grnny-smith-apple

 

It’s autumn and that means all thing apple.  I was just at a pumpkin carving party and brought an apple crisp for dessert.  It was a huge hit, so I thought you all should have the recipe as well.  I got the recipe when I bought a piece of stoneware from the Pampered Chef, so credits to them. It is super easy and always a crowd pleaser.

I am not a fan of the one-use kitchen gadget, but I do make an exception for the apple peeler/corer/slicer.  It take no time at all to get your apples ready, and that is the hardest part of this recipe. So go ahead and invest in one.

apple-peeler
Use the curly peels as a garnish for Apple-tinis.

 

 

Quick Apple Crisp-courtesy of The Pampered Chef

  • 5 Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, sliced
  • 9 ounces of yellow cake mix , approx. half a box
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon good quality cinnamon
  • 1/4 of butter, melted
  • 1/4 chopped nuts are optional
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Cut the peeled and cored apple slices in half and place in a 9″x 9″ baking dish.
  3. Combine all of the remaining ingredients and mix until crumbly. Sprinkle the mixture over the apples.
  4. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until apples are tender. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

Yield-10 servings.  This recipe also doubles easily, just use a 9″ x 13″ baking dish.

 

 

apple-cider-mimosa-2

I found this recipe in Country Living magazine and it is my go-to cocktail at any autumn party. Last Thanksgiving I made these as the welcome cocktail, serving it to my guests as they arrived.  Again, super easy and just delicious.

Apple Cider Mimosas

  • Prosecco or other bubbly of your choice
  • Fresh apple cider
  • good quality cinnamon
  • sugar
  • Champagne flutes
  1. Mix equal parts sugar and cinnamon in a bowl. Wet the rim of the Champagne flute and rim the glass with the sugar and cinnamon mixture.
  2. Fill the glass with half Prosecco and half fresh cider.
  3. Garnish with an apple slice.
  4. Toast your friends and family!

 

If you have any recipes that you would like to share,  let me know.

Happy Autumn, all.